Buddhist Meditation -road to emancipation

This article describes and explains partly the Buddhist Meditation technique expounded in the Anapanasati Sutra.This Sutra describes a practice that has come down to us from the Buddha himself.Anapana means breathing and the word sati means awareness. Anapanasati is therefore the practice of awareness of the breath. Buddhist Meditation This is a particularly good Buddhist Meditation as you can practice it at any and all times during the day and not just in those hours when you are meditating.This sutra has been described as the incomparable path leading to emancipation. For our purposes however, it would suffice if we gained some peace and happiness and some freedom from our fretful, anxious selves.The sutra consists of 16 verses or methods of Buddhist Meditation. In this article I will describe and explain the first 2 verses only which will be enough to calm us down, get ourselves started and give us the experience decide whether we wish to continue, stop or progress further. The sutra reads as follows: –Following the breath in daily life – eliminating forgetfulness and unnecessary thinking.“Breathing in, he knows that he is breathing in; and breathing out he knows that he is breathing out. Breathing in a long breath he knows, “I am breathing in a long breath.” Breathing out a long breath he knows, “I am breathing out a long breath.” Breathing in a short breath he knows “I am breathing in a short breath”. Breathing out a short breath he knows, “I am breathing out a short breath”’ Very simple These sutras sound very simple; you may think what is so earth-shakingly important about knowing whether I am breathing in or breathing out. Do not be fooled. By doing this exercise you will force yourself to be free of your thoughts and desires. You will be free of your joys, sorrows, anger and unease and gain some peace.You can practice this exercise during your hours of meditation with profit. You can also – if you choose – integrate this method in your daily life and practice it as you go about your day-to-day chores. Most of our day-to-day chores can be done and made meaningful by practice of this method of Buddhist Meditation. While sitting, walking, standing you combine awareness of breathing with all the movements of the body. While sitting – “I am breathing in and I am sitting down”. While standing – “I am breathing out and I am standing”. While doing something which involves attention such as chopping onions – “I am breathing in and I am aware that my right hand is chopping onions” This is the way we can practice.You may find that the time taken for an in breath or out breath is too short to say the complete sentence to yourself. In that case say “Breathing in – sitting” or “Breathing in – standing” or “Breathing out – chopping onions” and so on.By following your breath and combining conscious breathing with your daily activities you will cut across the stream of disturbing thoughts and become peaceful. This is also an exercise that leads to stopping of our thoughts so that we can observe them. It also leads to an increase in our powers of concentration. You may find it difficult to sustain your practice over the weeks, months and years if you are practicing alone. It will be of immense help to you if you can form a group or community of likeminded friends who are interested in Buddhist Meditation. The group can then support and encourage each other. As I mentioned earlier the Anapanasati sutra describes 16 forms of Buddhist Meditation. I have explained in brief the first 2 methods, which are quite enough for you to dis identify with your mind and your grasping, anxious ego and gain peace.  I hope you enjoyed this article and that it will be useful to you.Stay tuned for more in this continuing series.